New Haven Railroad Historical Events

Date
Category
Event

9/18/1947
1st Bankruptcy Trusteeship of NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RAILROAD ended when Federal Court confirmed Plan of

Reorganization - returned to private ownership.

9/18/1947
Abandonment Wood River Branch in Rhode Island abandoned.

9/18/1947
1st Bankruptcy OLD COLONY RAILROAD, HARTFORD & CONNECTICUT WESTERN RAILROAD, PROVIDENCE WARREN &

BRISTOL RAILROAD - those segments not abandoned acquired by NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD

9/11/1949
End of Service Last run of The East Wind from Bangor, Maine, to Penn Station, New York; begins running to Grand Central in 1950 season.

9/25/1949
End of Service New Haven discontinues passenger service between Taunton and Fall River.

9/1/1958
End of Service The New Haven Railroad discontinues all passenger service between Hartford and Blackstone. (act. ca. 4/27/58 from storm

damage! date is date of A-sheet)

9/1/1958
End of Service Last trips of the Night Cape Codder and the weekend Neptune between Grand Central and Woods Hole/Hyannis; replaced by

bus for 1959 season; Neptune is revived in 1960. (tt)

9/5/1958
End of Service Last run of New Haven Railroad passenger service between Boston and Taunton, New Bedford and Fall River via Stoughton,

which had refused to join Old Colony subsidy plan; service cut back to Stoughton, Mass.

9/7/1958
End of Service Last trip of Day Cape Codder between Grand Central and Woods Hole/Hyannis; later revived in 1960.

9/8/1976
End of Service Last two Amtrak United Aircraft "TurboTrain" sets make last revenue run New York-Boston because of mechanical problems.

(PTJ)

9/9/1976
Opening of Service Amtrak introduces the Clamdigger, New Haven-Providence local.

9/11/1988
Milestone George Alpert, the last president of the New Haven Railroad died at the age of 90 at his home in Cohasset, MA. He was

president of the New Haven Railroad from 1956 to 1961 when the carrier went into bankruptcy. Several months after he left

the railroad, the Interstate Commerce Commission made public its opinion that primarily passenger railroads, such as the

New Haven, must have federal subsidies to exist. This view had long been held by Alpert and he had testified several times

before the ICC on the subject. Prior to his tenure with the New Haven Railroad, Alpert was a founder of Brandeis University

and its first chairman from 1946 to 1954. Born in Boston, Alpert graduated from Boston University Law School in 1918 and

was first assistant district attorney for Suffolk County from 1924 to 1927.

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